Dropbox just debuted its Carousel photo management app last week, and it’s already making strides to boost the software’s storage chops. Today, the cloud-minded outfit acquired Loom: a photo storage service that became a popular alternative to…

Source: http://feeds.engadget.com/~r/weblogsinc/engadget/~3/LweQ3gg_wZw/
Category: Google Glass   Google Maps Pokemon   Bode Miller Wife  

Shooting Challenge: Photo Mosaics

You’ve all seen the effect. There’s a picture, but inside that picture lives a thousand little pictures that create the pigment. The effect is called a photo mosaic. And it’s easier to make than you think.

Read more…



Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/gwjZWJ8u7nI/shooting-challenge-photo-mosaics-1563823667
Category: Jack Gleeson   joakim noah   Transformers 4   The Americans   Ray Rice  

​Why Roku Matters More Than Ever

You have more streaming TV options than you could hope for, especially now that Amazon has entered the fray. And while Apple TV, Chromecast, and Fire TV all have their strengths, they also share the same crippling weakness: self-interest. That’s what makes Roku so important.

Read more…

    



Source: http://feeds.gawker.com/~r/gizmodo/full/~3/Ke8I5UH1fXc/why-roku-matters-more-than-ever-1558433873
Category: Washington Mudslide   ash wednesday   Flappy Bird creator   denver post   chicago  

Fitting in an errand run, Doutzen Kroes headed out with her son Phyllon in New York City on Tuesday (November 5).

The Victoria’s Secret Angel opted for a makeup-free face as she and her little one enjoyed some time at the playground.

As previously reported by GossipCenter, the 28-year-old supermodel told Page Six how she sympathizes with other women about how the modeling industry affects their self-esteem.

“Sometimes it makes me feel guilty now that I am in this profession that makes certain girls insecure,” Doutzen explained.

Miss Kroes also shared her discomfort about being airbrushed. “I always say, I don’t like the pictures. If you put me in a bad light with no hair and makeup, it’s not good…”

“I wake up sometimes like, this is not what I see when I look at the magazine, who is this visitor in the bathroom?” she added.

Source: http://celebrity-gossip.net/doutzen-kroes/doutzen-kroes-phyllons-big-apple-playdate-955850
Similar Articles: EBT   kris jenner   lesean mccoy   Seaside Heights   Sloane Stephens  

(AP) — NEWS: Charter Communications Inc. said Tuesday that its third-quarter loss narrowed, helped by contributions from an acquisition this summer and higher revenue from its cable TV business.

DETAILS: Revenue from the company’s pay TV services rose 15 percent to $1.04 billion, while revenue from high-speed Internet subscribers jumped 23 percent to $575 million. Revenue from phone services fell 23 percent to $161 million.

NUMBERS: Charter posted a loss of $70 million, or 68 cents per share, compared with a loss of $87 million, or 87 cents per share, in the same quarter of 2012.

Revenue rose 13 percent to $2.12 billion from $1.88 billion, with a big boost from the acquisition of Cablevision’s Bresnan Broadband unit in July. Excluding the acquisition, revenue grew 5 percent.

Analysts, on average, expected profit of 8 cents per share on $2.11 billion in revenue, according to FactSet.

STOCK: Dow $5.15, or 3.8 percent, to $130.62 in morning trading.

Associated PressSource: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/495d344a0d10421e9baa8ee77029cfbd/Article_2013-11-05-US-Earns-Charter-Communications/id-b5dfcf96872940548795e4862c540c96
Tags: iPad Air   Government Shutdown Over   Presidents Cup   powerball winning numbers   alexander skarsgard  

The year isn’t over yet, but I’ve already reached my limit of trying to make sense of many new developments. So I’m ready to start the season of prognostication early. Originally, I figured I’d reel off some predictions about the coming year. But we’re at one of those rare junctures when a bunch of trends have begun to crystallize — and I’m pretty sure many of them will persist for more than 12 months.

Here’s my mixed bag of nine trends. Feel free to add your own.

[ Stay on top of the cloud with the “Cloud Computing Deep Dive” special report. Download it today! | For more on the next-generation Web, read “The triumph of JavaScript” and “You’re already living in the cloud.” | For a quick, smart take on the news you’ll be talking about, subscribe to InfoWorld TechBrief. ]

1. Cloud is the new hardware. Credit Pivotal CEO Paul Maritz with this one. The thesis: All big industry shifts have been driven by new computing platforms, from the PC to client-server to the Internet. For servers, storage, and networking equipment to behave like one big “machine,” where applications can assume massive scalability, the entire infrastructure must be virtualized and centrally controllable — that is, software-defined. Ultimately this trend goes beyond SDN to include every system in the data center, all the way to HVAC. Advanced software control schemes pioneered by public cloud providers will continue to trickle down to the enterprise.

2. Systems of engagement lead the way. So what do you need massive cloud scalability for? Not old-fashioned enterprise “systems of record,” such as ERP, where the data model seldom changes and you know roughly how many people will use it. Where the cloud shines is in powering “systems of engagement”: customer-facing Web and mobile applications whose usage may fluctuate by magnitudes.

Optimizing that customer interaction has become the hottest area of technology, driving the development of elastic infrastructure, new database technologies, and the collection and analysis of big data (mainly Web clickstreams and other user data). Big data analysis using Hadoop-based applications may be the single biggest advancement in enterprise technology in the last decade. Not far behind are NoSQL databases such as MongoDB, Cassandra, and Couchbase, which scale out like crazy and enable on-the fly changes to data models.

3. Big data gets ahead of itself. Big data analytics hold enormous promise, but in the near term there are simply too many big data solutions searching for problems. In the long term, the potential for big data goes way beyond optimizing e-commerce to embrace all kinds of verticals, from manufacturing to transportation to the electrical grid.

But those vertical areas require the industrial Internet (also known as the Internet of things) to come online, where connected sensors deliver huge quantities of telemetry to foster improvements in product design, accurate prediction of failure, and so on. GE and IBM are early leaders in this area, but we’re just at the start. Years from now when the industrial Internet is in full swing, big data will be really, really big, and the thirst for big data analytics solutions will be unquenchable. Meanwhile, if any bubbles burst in 2014, big data will go first.

4. Cloud integration moves to the fore. Big data has a tendency to stay where it is, with a growing number of data stores in the cloud feeding cloud-based analytics. Cloud adoption in general, particularly SaaS applications with data stores of their own, runs the risk of replaying the bad old days of the siloed organization where duplicate yet slightly different records about the same products and customers were scattered in isolated data stores (along with valuable processes that should have been shared).

The answer is twofold: cloud integration and more, better APIs. Cloud integration players abound, including Cordys, Dell Boomi, IBM Cast Iron, Informatica, Layer 7, MuleSoft, SnapLogic, and WSO2. Plus, APIs apparently have their own conference now — along with new API solutions such as those offered by Apigee, which enable enterprises to publish and maintain their own public APIs.

5. Identity is the new security. A wild exaggeration, but the fact is that identity must now stretch to fit both on-premises and SaaS applications. Managing who has access to what — and deprovisioning employees when they leave the company — is becoming both more essential and more complicated. Microsoft, Okta, Salesforce, and others are rolling out solutions. Without cloud identity management, enterprises can’t adopt public cloud solutions safely and effectively.

Source: http://akamai.infoworld.com/t/cloud-computing/9-trends-2014-and-beyond-230099?source=rss_mobile_technology
Category: seahawks   michigan football   Jonathan Ferrell   george zimmerman   Lady Gaga Applause  

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry speaks during press conference in Cairo, Sunday, Nov. 3, 2013. Kerry is in Cairo pressing for reforms during the highest-level American visit to Egypt since the ouster of the country’s first democratically elected president. The Egyptian military’s removal of Mohammed Morsi in July led the U.S. to suspend hundreds of millions of dollars in aid. This is the first stop in an 11-day trip that will take Kerry to the Mideast and Europe. (AP Photo/Jason Reed, Pool)

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry speaks during press conference in Cairo, Sunday, Nov. 3, 2013. Kerry is in Cairo pressing for reforms during the highest-level American visit to Egypt since the ouster of the country’s first democratically elected president. The Egyptian military’s removal of Mohammed Morsi in July led the U.S. to suspend hundreds of millions of dollars in aid. This is the first stop in an 11-day trip that will take Kerry to the Mideast and Europe. (AP Photo/Jason Reed, Pool)

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, meets with Gen. Abdel Fattah el-Sissi, right, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Nov. 3, 2013. Kerry is in Cairo pressing for reforms during the highest-level American visit to Egypt since the ouster of the country’s first democratically elected president. The Egyptian military’s removal of Mohammed Morsi in July led the U.S. to suspend hundreds of millions of dollars in aid. This is the first stop in an 11-day trip that will take Kerry to the Mideast and Europe. (AP Photo/Jason Reed, Pool)

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, right, shakes hands with Egypt’s Foreign Minister Nabil Fahmy during a joint press conference in Cairo, Sunday, Nov. 3, 2013. Kerry is in Cairo pressing for reforms during the highest-level American visit to Egypt since the ouster of the country’s first democratically elected president. The Egyptian military’s removal of Mohammed Morsi in July led the U.S. to suspend hundreds of millions of dollars in aid. This is the first stop in an 11-day trip that will take Kerry to the Mideast and Europe. (AP Photo/Jason Reed, Pool)

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, center, is escorted by Gen. Abdel Fattah el-Sissi , right, in Cairo, Egypt, Sunday, Nov. 3, 2013. Kerry is in Cairo pressing for reforms during the highest-level American visit to Egypt since the ouster of the country’s first democratically elected president. The Egyptian military’s removal of Mohammed Morsi in July led the U.S. to suspend hundreds of millions of dollars in aid. This is the first stop in an 11-day trip that will take Kerry to the Mideast and Europe. (AP Photo/Jason Reed, Pool)

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry meets with Egypt’s interim President Adly Mansour in Cairo, Sunday, Nov. 3, 2013. Kerry is in Cairo pressing for reforms during the highest-level American visit to Egypt since the ouster of the country’s first democratically elected president. The Egyptian military’s removal of Mohammed Morsi in July led the U.S. to suspend hundreds of millions of dollars in aid. This is the first stop in an 11-day trip that will take Kerry to the Mideast and Europe. (AP Photo/Jason Reed, Pool)

CAIRO (AP) — The United States and Egypt tried Sunday to put a brave face on their badly frayed ties and committed to restoring a partnership undermined by the military ouster of Egypt’s first democratically elected president.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry became the highest-ranking Obama administration official to visit the country since the military toppled Mohammed Morsi in July and cracked down on his Muslim Brotherhood supporters.

Those moves led the U.S. to suspend hundreds of millions of dollars in aid. Morsi’s trial on charges of inciting murder was expected to begin Monday, at a location east of the capital. There were fears of renewed clashes between his backers and government security forces.

Kerry, who was starting a 10-day trip to the Middle East, Europe and North Africa, and Foreign Minister Nabil Fahmy pledged to ease tensions between Washington and Cairo. Yet the strains were clearly evident.

The State Department expected a frosty reception for Kerry, especially with tensions running high on the eve of Morsi’s trial. The department refused to confirm Kerry’s brief visit until he landed in Cairo, even though Egypt’s official news agency reported the impending trip Friday.

The secrecy was unprecedented for a secretary of state’s travel to Egypt, for decades one of the closest U.S. allies in the Arab world, and highlighted the deep rifts that have emerged.

Eager to avoid the potential for demonstrations related to his visit or Morsi’s impending trial, Kerry spent most of his time at a hotel near the airport. He ended his visit with meetings at the presidential palace and defense ministry.

Kerry said that the U.S.-Egyptian relationship should not be defined by American assistance. He insisted that the suspension of military aid was “not a punishment” and said it was a minor topic in his talks with Fahmy.

America’ chief diplomat held out the prospect of aid resumption as Egypt makes progress in restoring civilian democratic rule and ensuring the protection of basic human rights, including respect for freedom of expression, religion and the press.

“The United States believes that the U.S.-Egypt partnership is going to be strongest when Egypt is represented by an inclusive, democratically-elected, civilian government based on rule of law, fundamental freedoms, and an open and competitive economy,” Kerry told reporters at a news conference with Fahmy.

Kerry spoke of the importance of all trials being transparent and respecting rule of law, but did not specifically mention Morsi’s case, according to aides present in the meetings.

Instead, as he did in the news conference with Fahmy, Kerry spoke generally of U.S. disapproval of politically motivated arrests and prosecutions, and urged Egyptian authorities to respect due process and be transparent in any criminal proceedings, they said.

The officials, who spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to publicly discuss the private talks, said Kerry pressed the Egyptians not to renew a state of emergency that grants the government sweeping powers and is due to expire on Nov. 14.

Kerry also pushed for an end to the crackdown on Morsi supporters and other critics who renounce violence, the officials said.

The military chief, Gen. Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, has presented a “road map” to democracy that includes amending the Islamist-tilted constitution adopted under Morsi last year and putting the new charter to a nationwide referendum before the end of the year, then having parliamentary and presidential elections by this spring.

The officials said el-Sissi reiterated his commitment to that timetable, but appealed for the U.S. and others to be patient as Egypt struggles to restore democracy and get its economy back on track, the officials said.

Fahmy said last month that U.S.-Egyptian relations were in “turmoil” and the strain could affect the entire Middle East.

But on Sunday, he was less dire. He said Kerry’s positive comments about the road map indicated that “we are all pursuing a resumption of normal relations.”

Kerry offered cautious praise, saying the interim government “has made very important statements about the road map and is now engaged” in putting those steps in place.

Kerry last was in Egypt in March, when he urged Morsi to enact economic reforms and govern in a more inclusive manner. Those calls went unheeded. Simmering public unhappiness with his rule boiled over when the powerful military deposed Morsi.

The Obama administration was caught in a bind over whether to condemn the ouster as a coup and cut the annual $1.3 billion in U.S. military assistance that such a determination would legally require.

The U.S. waffled before deciding last month to suspend most big-ticket military aid such as tanks, helicopters and fighter jets, while declining to make a coup determination. The U.S. also is withholding $260 million in budget support to the government.

Egypt is receiving billions of dollars in aid from wealthy Gulf Arab states such as Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates. But Egyptian authorities reacted angrily to the U.S. aid suspension, declaring it a new low point in ties that have been troubled since the revolt that unseated authoritarian leader Hosni Mubarak in February 2011.

According to the U.S. officials, Kerry made the point that relying entirely on contributions from the oil-rich Gulf states is not sustainable, and that serious reform is needed to encourage foreign investment, boost domestic growth and restore the country’s once vibrant tourism sector.

With U.S. influence ebbing, Kerry’s message about the importance of economic and constitutional reforms was expected to be met with suspicion, if not outright hostility, by Egyptian leaders and a population deeply mistrustful of Washington’s motives.

Many Egyptians accuse the Obama administration of taking sides in their domestic political turmoil; American officials adamantly deny it.

From Egypt, Kerry planned to travel to Saudi Arabia, Poland, Israel, the Palestinian Authority, Jordan, the United Arab Emirates, Algeria and Morocco. The trip is widely seen as a damage control mission to ease disagreements between the U.S. and its friends over Syria, Iran and the revelations of widespread U.S. surveillance activities around the globe.

Associated PressSource: http://hosted2.ap.org/APDEFAULT/3d281c11a96b4ad082fe88aa0db04305/Article_2013-11-03-United%20States-Egypt-Kerry/id-09d98b05f7d24b5f99c81fb2b1f41d6c
Category: Easy Halloween Costumes   Bud Adams   affordable care act   What Is Labor Day   Kendrick Lamar Verse